Categories
Professional Development

ALA Annual 2014 Follow Up Notes

I have an extraordinary number of browser tabs open, which must mean the ALA Annual 2014 Conference is over. I escaped Vegas as quickly as possible and I’ve been traveling the west (the National Park Service? THE BEST). I’ve been jotting down notes on ALA Annual 2014 that I’ll record here.

The Takeaway

BIBFRAME. Are you in? WHY AREN’T YOU IN???

I learned bunches more about microdata. The Understanding Schema.org session was great. Dan Scott and Jason Clark have GOT THIS. See the session’s description and links to presentation slides. Highly recommended. I look forward to future discussions with my discovery folks.

In the realm of not-metadata, the LLAMA President’s Program, “Leaders as Followers: You don’t have to be in Charge to be a Leader” presented a management philosophy akin to one I’ve been trying to live for the last year. Carrie Messina pushed staff empowerment to the extreme through institutionalized storytelling. Lots to think about from this meeting. I can’t change the entire culture of the library but I can change the culture of my own cataloging unit…

Follow Up

There are countless sessions I will need to catch up on. I had to miss every big BIBFRAME session due to one service commitment or another.

Presentations

I gave two presentations at ALA Annual, one on competencies for catalogers, the other on authority data for a linked data future (co-presented with Indiana’s PCC Coordinator). I have lots of notes, comments, and follow up questions to think through–maybe I’ll post them here at a later date. I’m so grateful to everyone who shared their ideas with me!

Categories
Research

Just words

I thought I’d post a Wordle from a report I wrote recently.The report is the result of a couple weeks of collaborative brainstorming with four colleagues concerning the future of library authority data. Going through the brain acrobatics of imagining a recordless linked data environment that weaves together authority and bibliographic data was surprisingly enjoyable. In retrospect, I realized that I consistently used the phrase “authority data” rather than “authority metadata.” One person’s metadata is another person’s data I suppose. <stale NSA joke omitted/>

Wordle generated from a recently written report

On my writing list before the end of the year: cataloging policy and procedure and then my annual report. It’s a good thing I’m finally feeling better. Writing with medicine head and little sleep is no fun at all.