Categories
Teaching

Guest Lecture on Metadata

I gave a guest lecture for course S504: Cataloging at the School of Library and Information Science at Indiana University, Bloomington on 26 November 2011.

Abstract

Jennifer is the Metadata/Cataloging Librarian in the Wells Monographic Original Cataloging Unit. She will present on creating metadata for specific TEI, EAD, and MODS projects, and about collaborating with IU Archives, Lilly Library, and the Digital Library Program on these projects. Jennifer also trains catalogers how to create metadata. She’ll briefly explain the process, the metadata records, repurposing of MARC cataloging data, and shareable metadata. She’ll also talk about the parameters of metadata creation and use in Technical Services Departments.

Slides

Metadata

Exercises (zip file)

Categories
Presentations

Expanding Our Services Beyond MARC

I co-presented the talk, “Expanding Our Services: Cataloging and Metadata Beyond MARC” at the Indiana Library Federation Annual Conference in Indianapolis on 13 November 2012.

Abstract

In the past three years, the Cataloging Division of the Indiana University Libraries (Bloomington) Technical Services Department implemented the following new non-MARC metadata services: encoding digitized books in TEI, cataloging digital images, and encoding archival finding aids in EAD. In this same three year timeframe, the Cataloging Division lost 6.5 FTE positions through attrition, retirements, and other staffing reductions. How were Cataloging managers able to implement new services with fewer staff and a shrinking budget? We will share our stories, successes, and pitfalls in our endeavor to forge new, forward-thinking workflows and deliver new metadata services against all odds.

Slides

Expanding Our Services: Cataloging and Metadata Beyond MARC

Accompanying handout with glossary, links, and contact information

Categories
Libraries

When Fair Use Wins, Everybody Wins

U.S. District Judge Harold Baer (NY) threw out the copyright infringement suit filed by Authors Guild against HathiTrust partners University of California, University of Wisconsin, Cornell University, University of Michigan, and my own institution, Indiana University. Most of the materials in HathiTrust are scans originally produced by Google (the Authors Guild suit against Google is currently in appeal; publishers have settled with Google out of court). In addition to a fair use defense, Judge Baer cited the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as HathiTrust gives full-text audible access to the visually impaired.

If you want to read up on the case, there are more links on the Around the Web section of HathiTrust.

HathiTrust by the Numbers (as of October 2012). HathiTrust has 10,546,680 total volumes, 5,550,428 book titles, 274,239 serial titles, 3,691,338,000 pages, 473 terabytes, 125 miles of shelf equivalent, 8,569 tons of print matter equivalent, and 3,230,844 volumes (~31% of total) in the public domain.
Categories
Libraries

E-textbooks and laptop juggling

On my way back from lunch, I saw a student sitting on the library terrace with her thirteen-inch MacBook Pro propped on her lap, on it’s end, like an open book. She had rotated a PDF document ninety degrees and was using the arrow keys to scroll through the document. My wrists ache just thinking about it.

Ergonomics of laptop balancing aside, this reminded me of a recent article reporting that students participating in the etextbook pilot prefer reading print texts to electronic. Brad Wheeler, who is spearheading the etext pilot at IU, is confident that students will grow to prefer e-textbooks because of the better functionality possible with etextbooks (not to mention the cheaper price–at least 35% less than print).

I did a little reading up on eTexts at IU and looked in to the features provided by the Courseload platform. It supports all of the things I like to do with my electronic texts: searching, bookmarking, annotating. The annotations offered via Courseload are a bit beefier with options to tag, add notes with links, and embed media. Students can view annotations that the instructor has chosen to share with the class and students may opt to share annotations with the instructor or other students. Etexts and annotations are available offline and sync with Oncourse when a connection is available. Students have access to etexts and their annotations for as long as they are a student at IU. Students may opt to print etextbooks or receive a professional bound copy from publishers for a fee.

I wonder what the laptopbook student thinks about the eText initiative. Does she get frustrated by the device or software she uses to read her etexts? Does she take advantage of annotation tools? Does the etext platform help her collaborate with other students more effectively? Is collaboration a priority for her or her instructor? Does she have a genetic predisposition to carpal tunnel syndrome?

I annotate PDFs and EPUB files frequently but I’m not sure how many of my colleagues do so, or whether they use annotated documents for collaborative work. I have a favorite go-to app on my mobile devices to annotate PDFs. I also annotate texts on my desktop, although not as often. I would find it grating to have to use another app and have all of my annotations siloed off in a place separate from all of my other documents. I would also be greatly concerned about whether I actually owned the content I was creating or not. It is unclear whether students or instructors are even able to export their notes and annotations upon leaving IU.

Categories
Presentations

Cataloging Digital Books and Photographs

I presented the talk, “Cataloging Digital Books & Photographs” to my library’s Acquisitions and Document Delivery Services department colleagues on 7 December, 2011.

Abstract

Jennifer will present an overview of two digital collections that are receiving non-MARC metadata treatment in the Cataloging Division: the Indiana Authors and Their Books text-encoding project and the Frank M. Hohenberger Photograph Collection metadata project. Additional emphasis will be placed on the tools being used to complete cataloging work and the reuse of data to expose collections.

Slides

Cataloging Digital Books & Photographs

Categories
Presentations

Indiana Odyssey: Photograph Collection Metadata

I presented the talk, “An Indiana Odyssey: Enabling Discovery of the Frank M. Hohenberger Photograph Collection through Metadata Creation” at the Indiana Library Federation Annual Conference in Fort Wayne on 15 November 2011.

Abstract

If “a picture paints a thousand words,” then why do photograph collections need metadata? Join Indiana University’s Jennifer Liss for an overview of how the description of digital image collections may be integrated into a technical services workflow. Along the way, we’ll take a trip through Southern Indiana, as seen through the photographic lens of Frank M. Hohenberger.

Slides

An Indiana Odyssey: Enabling Discovery of the Frank M. Hohenberger Photograph Collection through Metadata Creation

Categories
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